Browse Prior Art Database

Facsimile Distribution in a LAN to Ambiguous Recipients

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000122725D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-04
Document File: 1 page(s) / 45K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Fitzpatrick, GP: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In a Local Area Network (LAN), specific Servers may be designated to send and receive facsimile documents on behalf of clients. A mechanism is needed which facilitates the receiving of facsimile documents (fax) for designated clients. Since current facsimile protocols do not provide a field which identifies the electronic address of the recipient, a methodology is needed that permits a client to ascertain which, if any, of the facsimile documents have been received by the Server for a given client.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 88% of the total text.

Facsimile Distribution in a LAN to Ambiguous Recipients

      In a Local Area Network (LAN), specific Servers may be
designated to send and receive facsimile documents on behalf of
clients. A mechanism is needed which facilitates the receiving of
facsimile documents (fax) for designated clients. Since current
facsimile protocols do not provide a field which identifies the
electronic address of the recipient, a methodology is needed that
permits a client to ascertain which, if any, of the facsimile
documents have been received by the Server for a given client.

      The cover page of a given fax distribution (once deciphered
into machine-readable bytes by on Optical Character Recognition
program, OCR) may contain ambiguous or insufficient information to
allow immediate routing of the fax by an address resolution program.
Upon receipt of an unrecognizable address, control would then be
passed to another Server process which would try to resolve the
character string(s) into an electronic address (or addresses) known
to the Server's distribution mechanism.

      In this case, a service capable of instituting a "fuzzy search"
would be invoked. The results of such a search would typically be a
list of several candidate entries (along with electronic addresses)
which match the search criteria. This list could be used by the
Server to notify each of those on the list that a fax has arrived,
and that one of them is likely the intended recipient. Alternately,
the implem...