Browse Prior Art Database

Mounting Removable Drives in a Computer System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000122776D
Original Publication Date: 1998-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-04
Document File: 4 page(s) / 101K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Denny, IM: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Removable hard drives, referred to as 'hot swap' drives, are usually mounted in a tray provided with a locking lever and a pull handle or a handle that combines both functions.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Mounting Removable Drives in a Computer System

      Removable hard drives, referred to as 'hot swap' drives, are
usually mounted in a tray provided with a locking lever and a pull
handle or a handle that combines both functions.

      These designs are usually difficult to use, especially for
left handed persons, and do not positively indicate when the drive is
correctly inserted and locked in position.

      The problem is addressed in the design described here by
mounting on the rear of the tray or housing one or more springs or
other resilient members that exert sufficient force when fully
compressed to  exceed that of the electrical connectors that are used
to provide signal  and power to the drive itself.

      The tray is inserted into the opening until it comes in contact
with the springs (or springs with the housing).  The user continues
to apply force that begins to compress the springs, while at the same
time the spring loaded retaining latch is driven up the lock pins
against the  spring force of the latch.

      When the rear springs are compressed sufficiently so that the
electrical connectors are properly engaged, the retaining latch is
driven by its spring to lock in position on the lock pins, providing
a readily  recognizable click action to indicate that the drive is in
position.

      The drive is released simply by lifting the retaining latch
handle to disengage it from the lock pins and the rear springs, then
drive the tray part way out of the opening.

      The lever could be operated by a button if desired and a rotary
or other damper could be used to smooth the engagement and
disengagement of the drive.

      The basic concept is shown in Fig. 1.  The drawer (1)
containing a hard disk, is provided with a hinged latching member (4)
which has a notch (5) on its upper edge.  In operation, the drawer is
pushed into the hot swap cage, compressing a spring (3), until the
notch (5...