Browse Prior Art Database

Generic Converter for Standard Generalized Markup Language Documents

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000122801D
Original Publication Date: 1998-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 47K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bolik, C: AUTHOR

Abstract

Standard Generalized Markup Language (SGML) is a general language for electronic document exchange. It describes the structure and semantics of a document without going into details, such as font sizes, etc. This high-level approach makes SGML suitable for exchanging documents across different platforms. Over the years, several SGML "dialects" have evolved, with Hyper Text Markup Language (HTML), that is being referred to as the language of the World Wide Web, being the most prominent one. Another example is the Common Desktop Environment (CDE) help system that uses a SGML variant as the source format. IBM* Information Development (ID) also uses another SGML dialect to write books, online documentation, etc.

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Generic Converter for Standard Generalized Markup Language Documents

      Standard Generalized Markup Language (SGML) is a general
language for electronic document exchange.  It describes the
structure and semantics of a document without going into details,
such as font sizes, etc.  This high-level approach makes SGML
suitable for exchanging documents across different platforms.  Over
the years, several SGML "dialects" have evolved, with Hyper Text
Markup Language (HTML), that is being referred to as the language of
the World Wide Web, being the most prominent one.  Another example is
the Common Desktop Environment (CDE) help system that uses a SGML
variant as the source format.  IBM* Information Development (ID) also
uses another SGML dialect to write books, online documentation, etc.

      Although there are several SGML dialects in widespread use, no
tool could be found that would allow for converting documents written
using an arbitrary dialect into another, with as little manual
interaction as possible.  Such a tool was required to translate the
ADSM online help written in ID's SGML dialect to the CDE help system.

      To automate the process of converting one SGML dialect into
another, a filter program has been written that is able to translate
the markup tags of one dialect into those of the other one, according
to a set of rules that are provided by the user in a separate file.
This process is not as simple as performing one to one word
substit...