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Method to Group Conference Enabled X Clients into Application Sets

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000122816D
Original Publication Date: 1998-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 117K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Ansberry, CM: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

An X 'application' is composed of one of more X client processes. Typically, each X client connects to the same X server so they may each interact with the same user. X clients may, or may not share X resources on the X server such as windows or pixmaps. In general the X server is unable and uninterested in identifying the X clients which comprise an 'application'.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 48% of the total text.

Method to Group Conference Enabled X Clients into Application Sets

      An X 'application' is composed of one of more X client
processes.  Typically, each X client connects to the same X server so
they may each interact with the same user.  X clients may, or may not
share X resources on the X server such as windows or pixmaps.  In
general the X server is unable and uninterested in identifying the X
clients which comprise an 'application'.

      One method to enable an X client for conferencing is to
distribute all X requests generated by an X client to multiple X
servers, with the effect that all X resources created by the X client
exist in the same state on multiple X servers.  An alternate method
is to distribute all X requests to a particular X resource to
multiple X servers, with the effect that a particular resource such
as a window exists in the same state on multiple X servers.

      The first method is efficient at ensuring that all resources
created by a conference enabled X client exist on multiple X servers.
If a second, but not conference enabled X client were to modify a
resource of a conference enabled X client, modification would not be
visible on  other X servers.

      The second method is efficient at ensuring that a particular X
resource exists, and is in the same state, on multiple X servers,
even if a second X client modifies the resource.  However, if the X
client which created the resource creates a second resource, the X
conference enabler must infer that the new resource must also be
distributed to the  same set of X servers as the first resource.

      Neither method is efficient at ensuring that all resources
of two cooperating X clients are distributed to the same set of X
servers.  Two X clients are cooperating if they are sharing X
resources, or if user interactions initiate or modify the state of
the second.  For example, a network management tool may consist of a
set of top level windows where each window is owned by a cooperating
X client.  The X clients may or may not share X resources, but
actions in one window may affect the display of other windows.

      It is clear that cooperating X clients must all be distributed
to the same set of X servers to ensure that all X resources created
by the X clients exist in the same state on all X servers.  Assuming
that the X conference enabler is able to distribute an X client to
multiple X servers, the enabler must identify the set of cooperating
X clients comprising an 'application' such that all of the X
resources of the application are distributed to the same set of X
servers.  For the purposes of this disclosure, an application set is
the set of cooperating X clients which comprise an application.  The
problem to be  solved is: by what method may a collection of X
clients be grouped into  application sets.

      Virtually all X clients may be directed to a specific X server
by setting the DISPLAY environment varia...