Browse Prior Art Database

Augmentation of the Microsoft TCP/IP Stack via an Network Driver Interface Specification Intermediate Driver

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000122853D
Original Publication Date: 1998-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 91K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Deitrick, KF: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This article discloses the use of a Network Driver Interface Specification (NDIS) Intermediate Driver as part of a framework to augment and extend the function of the Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 TCP/IP (Transmission Control Protocol / Internet Protocol) stack. The extension mechanism (also known as a "wedge" or "shim") permits multiple applications to access and modify the network data that flows into and out of the TCP/IP stack.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 53% of the total text.

Augmentation of the Microsoft TCP/IP Stack via an Network Driver
Interface Specification Intermediate Driver

      This article discloses the use of a Network Driver Interface
Specification (NDIS) Intermediate Driver as part of a framework to
augment and extend the function of the Microsoft Windows NT 4.0
TCP/IP (Transmission Control Protocol / Internet Protocol) stack.
The extension  mechanism (also known as a "wedge" or "shim") permits
multiple applications to access and modify the network data that
flows into and  out of the TCP/IP stack.

      As a networking application provider, it is difficult to extend
the function provided by the TCP/IP stack that Microsoft ships with
its Windows NT operating system.  Version 4.0 of the Windows NT
product provides for the creation of an intermediate driver.  The
intermediate driver binds between a protocol (e.g., the TCP/IP stack)
and the Network  Interface Card (NIC) drivers which access the
physical network.  We provide an intermediate driver and extensions
which allow other applications to access all of the network data that
flows through the intermediate driver.  These applications are
external to the TCP/IP stack, but can now influence the data which
flows into and out of the stack, thereby, allowing for augmentation
and modification of the overall  stack function.

Examples of augmenting function that could be performed by an
external application are:
  o  Monitoring and reporting on the data flow at an arbitrary
      level of detail.
  o  Supporting a ported TCP/IP application which requires a
      programming interface that is not available with the
      Microsoft stack.
  o  Exercising flow control or "class of service" management
      over network interfaces.
  o  Data translation or substitution including data compression
      and encryption.

The block diagram shows the components that provide the augmentation
capability.
  1.  The darkened box on the le...