Browse Prior Art Database

E-Mail Print Job Purging

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000123020D
Original Publication Date: 1998-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-04
Document File: 1 page(s) / 25K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Breslau, FC: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for purging email messages that have been queued up for printing. Rather than save files that can be deleted after they have been printed to ensure successful printing, this method allows immediate deletion because the print data is stored in a new temporary file pending successful printing. This file is named "print save file." Additionally, not all print jobs need be stored in the "Print Save File" (PSF); the user may specify that only print jobs associated with printers on a "Printer Preference List" (PPL) are stored in this file. Thus, a user might specify network printers on the PPL where it cannot be quickly ascertained whether the printing has been completed successfully.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 100% of the total text.

E-Mail Print Job Purging

      Disclosed is a method for purging email messages that have been
queued up for printing.  Rather than save files that can be deleted
after they have been printed to ensure successful printing, this
method allows immediate deletion because the print data is stored in
a new temporary file pending successful printing.  This file is named
"print save file."  Additionally, not all print jobs need be stored
in the "Print Save File" (PSF); the user may specify that only print
jobs associated with printers on a "Printer Preference List" (PPL)
are stored in this file.  Thus, a user might specify network printers
on the PPL where it cannot be quickly ascertained whether the
printing has been completed successfully.

      The individual print job is deleted from the PSF when:
  A) The user manually deletes the print job
  B) The system receives a message that the print job has been
      successfully spooled and/or printed (like Windows NT Release
      4.0 does today).