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Organic Light-Emitting Devices for Photolithographic Applications

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000123055D
Original Publication Date: 1998-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 71K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Andreoli, C: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a procedure for the use of organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) to expose photoresist for lithographic applications. This involves using an OLED whose emission wavelength overlaps the sensitized spectral region of a photoresist, thereby replacing the typical ultraviolet (UV) lamp used in photolithography. Using a patterned light-emitting flat array of OLEDs can also remove the need for a separate lithographic mask and mask-alignment step for applications which require resolutions of 0.5&mu.m.

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Organic Light-Emitting Devices for Photolithographic Applications

      Disclosed is a procedure for the use of organic
light-emitting devices (OLEDs) to expose photoresist for
lithographic applications.  This involves using an OLED whose
emission wavelength overlaps the sensitized spectral region of a
photoresist, thereby replacing the typical ultraviolet (UV) lamp
used in photolithography.  Using a patterned light-emitting flat
array of OLEDs can also remove the need for a separate lithographic
mask and mask-alignment step for applications which require
resolutions of 0.5&mu.m.

Typically  OLEDs  are  manufactured  with the structure:
Glass/transparent anode/organic films/opaque metal cathode (1).  Upon
applying a voltage, positive  and negative charge carriers are
injected from the electrodes and recombine  radiatively in the
organic film.  In the standard device, light is observed through the
transparent anode and glass substrate.  There are OLEDs which emit
with wavelengths of less than 400nm (2), and furthermore, organic
materials can be chemically synthesized to emit the desired
electroluminescence spectrum.  Therefore the photosensitized
spectral region of the photoresist and/or the emission spectrum of
the organic electroluminescent material can be made consistent in
this application.

Photolithography is typically done by placing a patterned mask in
proximity to a photoresist-coated sample and then illuminating the
mask with an ultraviolet lamp.  Three embodiments for using OLEDs to
replace the lamp and the mask/lamp combination are described: First,
one may fabricate an unpatterned, large-area standard OLED on a glass
substrate (1) and use it to expose photoresist through a mask.  The
advan...