Browse Prior Art Database

Providing Upgradability to Computer Monitors

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000123093D
Original Publication Date: 1998-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 78K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Eagle, DJ: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

In today's environment within the IT industry, technologies and customer requirements are constantly changing. New technologies are often expensive to implement and are required only by a proportion of users, so in the monitor area it has been standard practice to develop and release separate unique models that have the required features, whilst still offering the standard base monitor.

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Providing Upgradability to Computer Monitors

   In today's environment within the IT industry,
technologies and customer requirements are constantly changing.  New
technologies are often expensive to implement and are required only
by a proportion of users, so in the monitor area it has been standard
practice to develop and release separate unique models that have the
required features, whilst still offering the standard base monitor.

   The practice of releasing different monitor models with
the different features is very inefficient in all respects:

   Invariably, slightly different implementations are
required on each product to allow for mechanical or electrical
differences.  The resulting development activity is extremely
resource intensive.

   Manufacturing need to produce an increased number of
different types of product, losing economies of scale.

   Distribution channels need to carry many more different
models, giving the possibility of poor model split forecasting
resulting in surplus inventory on one model whilst another model in
the same range is out of stock.  The risk of write-offs or
write-downs is also increased, affecting profitability.

   Time to market with new features is affected due to the
high workload demands that this approach places on all the affected
parties.

   Customers do not have the ability to upgrade their products
after purchase.

   Existing field upgrade solutions provide, for example a
USB hub that plugs into a slot in the back of the monitor, and a
tilt/swivel base that the customer can swap with the one that comes
factory fitted when they purchase the monitor.  These are specific
solutions that work well on individual products for a particular
feature.  However, they cannot be applied across a complete product
range because:

   The plug-in feature requires considerable real estate which
may preclude use in smaller monitors (14", 15" and 17").  The
plug-in approach also imposes size and function limitations on th...