Browse Prior Art Database

Household Time Synchronization

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000123151D
Original Publication Date: 1998-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-04
Document File: 1 page(s) / 36K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Allen, M: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

We propose a system where-by a computer can be used a time source for other time devices (TV, VCR, clock radios, etc.) in a system with a common AC Power source. In order to do this we propose extending the X-10 protocol which is currently used to turn on and off devices such as lights. The computer would transmit a series of hits containing the current time over the house's electrical wiring. All of the afore- mentioned devices that plug into the wall could be modified so they have a X-10 receiver built into their power supply. The receivers would respond to the X-10 protocol, including our proposed extension to set the time.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 82% of the total text.

Household Time Synchronization

   We propose a system where-by a computer can be used a time
source for other time devices (TV, VCR, clock radios, etc.) in a
system with a common AC Power source.  In order to do this we
propose extending the X-10 protocol which is currently used to turn
on and off devices such as lights.  The computer would transmit a
series of hits containing the current time over the house's
electrical wiring.  All of the afore- mentioned devices that plug
into the wall could be modified so they have a X-10 receiver built
into their power supply.  The receivers would respond to the X-10
protocol, including our proposed extension to set the time.

   The computer's time is kept accurate by receiving the
current time either over the Web or through special add-on cards.  A
battery on the motherboard makes sure the computer does not lose the
time when it loses power or is shut down.  So after a power failure,
the computer can be powered up and all of the devices in the house
will have their time set correctly.  Also the computer can recognize
daylight savings time changes.

   The X-10 Protocol consists of a Start Code, a House Code
and either a Number Code or a Function Code.  The protocol has an
"Extended Code" which is Function Code 01111 (binary) indicates the
next 8 bits are a byte of data.  This byte of data represents how
much data follows.  An identification token will be needed to
distinguish the time packet from other packets (2 bytes)....