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A Universal Way to Set NLS Keyboard Input Mode per Text Input Field

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000123206D
Original Publication Date: 1998-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-04
Document File: 4 page(s) / 133K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Shiratori, T: AUTHOR

Abstract

A program is disclosed that simulation of key operation can be a universal way to set NLS (National Language Support) keyboard input mode as desired. In order for GUI (Graphical User Interface) program components to let the keyboard input mode of input method program per input field be a desired input mode every time when focus is gained, the algorithm consists of an input mode Query part and an input mode Setting part which involve simulation of key operation as a mean to communicate with any input method programs. These are invoked right after the focus is gained. Necessary key events to switch the current input mode to the desired one is derived from a particular arithmetic operation where input mode is mapped into a particular bit value. The Fig. 1 shows the overall flow per input field.

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A Universal Way to Set NLS Keyboard Input Mode per Text Input Field

   A program is disclosed that simulation of key operation can
be a universal way to set NLS (National Language Support) keyboard
input mode as desired.  In order for GUI (Graphical User Interface)
program components to let the keyboard input mode of input method
program per input field be a desired input mode every time when
focus is gained, the algorithm consists of an input mode Query part
and an input mode Setting part which involve simulation of key
operation as a mean to communicate with any input method programs.
These are invoked right after the focus is gained.  Necessary key
events to switch the current input mode to the desired one is derived
from a particular arithmetic operation where input mode is mapped
into a particular bit value.  The Fig. 1 shows the overall flow per
input field.

   The Input Mode Query part (1) further consists of three
subparts as shown in Fig. 2, Pre-selected Text Store subpart (1a),
KeyEvent Construction subpart (1b), and Committed Text Test subpart
(1c).

   When the input field gains focus, it may already have
texts which have been in selected mode.  To avoid losing such a
pre-selected text string by operations of the next KeyEvent
Construction subpart, Pre-selected Text Store subpart (1a) stores
those texts into a temporary space.  The temporary stored selected
texts are later restored by Selected Text Restore subpart (2c).
KeyEvent Construction subpart (1b) constructs the minimum number of
KeyEvents to generate a text to be tested to determine the current
input mode.  These KeyEvents are handled by Input Method program as
if these were typed from keyboard by the end user and a committed
text is returned.  Right after the committed text is obtained, a
VK_BACK_SPACE key event is also constructed to remove the committed
text generated for the test from the input field.  Committed Text
Test subpart (1c) tests the committed text to determine the current
input mode.  The rules to derive the current input mode from the
committed text as the result of the KeyEvent constructions are mostly
common in Input Method programs of a particular NLS language.  These
may be held as customizable information in a table format.  For an
example, if VK_A and VK_ENTER KeyEvents are constructed to test
Japanese keyboard's input mode, the relationship between committed
texts and input modes is a...