Browse Prior Art Database

Scalable Axis for Graphical Content

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000123213D
Original Publication Date: 1998-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 97K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Lefave, KA: AUTHOR

Abstract

A user interface control for scrolling and scaling the contents of a graphic display (graph, drawing, map, ...) within the confines of a fixed space (eg. a window on the display). This user interface control expands on the commonly known "slide bar" control in use today. It consists of the following features, described using a graph as its example graphical display.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Scalable Axis for Graphical Content

   A user interface control for scrolling and scaling the
contents of a graphic display (graph, drawing, map, ...) within the
confines of a fixed space (eg. a window on the display).  This user
interface control expands on the commonly known "slide bar" control
in use today.  It consists of the following features, described using
a graph as its example graphical display.

   There are 2 slide bar controls parallel to each other
running along the direction in which the graph is to be scrolled and
scaled.  Slide bar 1 is closest to the graph and it contains a shaft
with a single arm, like the volume control on old stereo equipment.
If the x-axis were below the graph, then slide bar 1 would be the
first (top) of 2, located directly below the graph.  Slide bar 2 lies
adjacent to slide bar 1, is aligned parallel to it, and contains a
shaft with 2 handles.  The 2 handles work independently as well as
forming a special zone between them which can be manipulated.  In the
example above, slide bar 2 would be the second (bottom) of 2, located
directly under the graph.

   Slide bar 1 represents the range of graph values which are
currently visible on the display.  It has text on either end which
tells the user the range of these values.  Slide bar 2 represents
the range of ALL graph values available for viewing, even though
only a portion of them may be visible (as apparent on slide bar 1).
It also has text on either end which tells the user what the full
range is (the text could also appear below, and aligned with the ends
of the slide bar).  The range of slide bar 1 is thus a subset of the
range of slide bar 2.  The special zone on slide bar 2, delimited by
the 2 arms on the shaft, represent the location of the currently
visible values in slide bar 1 relative to the entire range of values
slide bar 2 represents.

   The user manipulates the graph view, by clicking and
dragging the single arm on slide bar 1, the 2 separate arms on slide
bar 2, and the special zone between the 2 arms on slide bar 2.

   The arm on slide bar 1 controls the current value of
interest on the graph.  Imagine that the arm takes a slice from the
graph at a certain point on the x-axis, which could notify another
window to provide extra detail about the graph at that point on the
axis.  For example, if there were multiple line graphs displayed at
once, the slice could drive a table of current y-axis values for each
separate graph line.

   The leftmost arm on slide bar 2 controls the lower limit
of the values currently visible on th...