Browse Prior Art Database

Method for Sending E-mail through an Ordinary Telephone Handset

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000123221D
Original Publication Date: 1998-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-04
Document File: 1 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Mandalia, BD: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for providing for Internet e-mail transmission over the standard telephone network through an ordinary telephone handset. A server also connected to the telephone network is used to convert DTMF (Dual Tone Multi-Frequency) signals generating using the telephone keypad into e-mail messages.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 73% of the total text.

Method for Sending E-mail through an Ordinary Telephone Handset

   Disclosed is a method for providing for Internet e-mail
transmission over the standard telephone network through an ordinary
telephone handset.  A server also connected to the telephone network
is used to convert DTMF (Dual Tone Multi-Frequency) signals
generating using the telephone keypad into e-mail messages.

   As in conventional methods for transmitting e-mail, each
user has an e-mail address within a specific Internet domain
address.  With the new method, each Internet domain, the e-mail ID
within a domain, and common phrases are all coded as numeric
messages.  Optionally, a large vocabulary may be encoded as numeric
data, with the encoding process being facilitated through the use of
a hand-held translation device not needing communication
capabilities.

   The server is a standard (IVR Interactive Voice Response)
unit, which accepts input in the form of DTMF signals, and which
plays back voice prompts for the user.  The server may be commercial
system or a peripheral device within the public switched telephone
network.

   For example, e-mail transmission is begun when the user
dials a phone-based e-mail facility server.  Next, the server
prompts the user for the destination domain, and the user presses
the telephone buttons in a sequence sending a numeric message
representing the destination domain, such as "ibm.com."  Next, the
server prompts the user for the destination id/address, and...