Browse Prior Art Database

Signalling Asynchyronous Events

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000123236D
Original Publication Date: 1998-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-04
Document File: 1 page(s) / 32K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Charters, GC: AUTHOR

Abstract

Asynchronous events by their nature do not occur as a direct result of user input. However, it is often the case that the user requires feedback from an application in order to know that such an event has occurred. In general such feedback is supplied by displaying a message, and/or displaying a busy cursor if the application is to stop responding whilst processing the event. In many cases this is not ideal as the busy cursor does not supply sufficient information as to the nature of the event, and the text area is not usually where the user's attention is focused, and can therefore be missed.

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Signalling Asynchyronous Events

   Asynchronous events by their nature do not occur as a
direct result of user input.  However, it is often the case that the
user requires feedback from an application in order to know that such
an event has occurred.  In general such feedback is supplied by
displaying a message, and/or displaying a busy cursor if the
application is to stop responding whilst processing the event.  In
many cases this is not ideal as the busy cursor does not supply
sufficient information as to the nature of the event, and the text
area is not usually where the user's attention is focused, and can
therefore be missed.

   By changing the graphic appropriately during the processing
of asynchronous events, the user can be informed of their
occurrence.  The solution described here provides a different cursor
graphic which depicts the event which has occurred.  A typical
implementation is in an application which is used for generating
valuable data.  The cost of data loss due to system failure is
therefore important.  Thus the data is automatically saved at a
regular user defined time interval.  Because the user's attention is
in general focused on the pointer, the graphic is charged for example
to a computer disk representation (as opposed to a busy cursor) to
signal that the auto save is occurring.

   The important stages in such an implementation are as
follows:
  1.  An asynchronous event occurs.
  2.  The cursor graphic is changed to represent...