Browse Prior Art Database

Wide Area Distributed Platform

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000123250D
Original Publication Date: 1998-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-04
Document File: 3 page(s) / 115K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Arnold, D: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A large network, such as that employed by a retail bank, stores data locally at each of its branches and requires the ability to perform transactions in remote branches. The following problems can arise:- 1) Even with as few as 10 workstations per branch, the number of branches can quickly make the total number of workstations exceed the maximum number of workstations supported by the network software. 2) There is no mechanism for sharing resources between branches. 3) The local area network transport protocol may be incompatible with the protocol used to connect each branch to its host mainframe.

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Wide Area Distributed Platform

   A large network, such as that employed by a retail bank,
stores data locally at each of its branches and requires the ability
to perform transactions in remote branches.  The following problems
can arise:-
  1) Even with as few as 10 workstations per branch, the number of
branches can quickly make the total number of workstations exceed the
maximum number of workstations supported by the network software.
  2) There is no mechanism for sharing resources between branches.
  3) The local area network transport protocol may be incompatible
with the protocol used to connect each branch to its host mainframe.

   The solution described here provides a bridge to connect
workstations using Message Queuing software.

   The aim of the Bridge is to enable Client applications in
one Local Area Network (LAN) to access remote Servers in another LAN
using Message Queuing software.  Figure 1 illustrates the role of the
Client Server bridge.

   The bridge consists of 2 components:
  1.  Bridge Interface - runs on the local Server
      - receives requests from local clients
      - Packages the request from the LAN Middleware API within
        a Message
      - routes requests to remote servers using Message Queuing
        software
      - waits for the response from the remote server
      - ensures that the response received is for the original
        request
      - unpackages the response from the Message
      - returns the request to the appropriate client, in LAN
        Middleware API format
  2.  Remote Server   - runs on the remote Server
      - receives Messages from remote Server
      - unpackages the LAN Middleware from the Message
      - executes the request using the LAN API
      - packages the LAN Middleware API request within a Message
      - routes the message to the originating Server using
        Message
      - Queuing software

   An application running on a Client can call the Bridge,
which runs on the local Server.  The application can either execute
the command locally using LAN Middleware or use the Bridge to ship
the request, using Message Queuing software, to a remote Server.  At
the remote end, the bridge would interface with the remote Server
Middleware to execute the command.  The bridge would return the
response from a remote Server to the application as if it was
executed locally.

   An example application would be to route remote requests
from a Client in one bank branch to a Server in another branch.

   The bridge introduced 4 other concepts:
  1.  Remote Application Server
        While Programmers working in a LAN environment will be
familiar with the Client Server Middleware API, they will not have
developed skills in using the Message Queuing software introduced
with the Bridge.
        The Application will be able to use the API offered...