Browse Prior Art Database

Visor Control in a Virtual Reality Environment

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000123272D
Original Publication Date: 1998-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-04
Document File: 1 page(s) / 111K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Lection, DB: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

When a user views a virtual world on a personal computer the user is presented with a three dimensional view of the virtual world. If the virtual world allows user interaction the user will be allowed to navigate in the world and interact with objects in the world.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 87% of the total text.

Visor Control in a Virtual Reality Environment

   When a user views a virtual world on a personal computer
the user is presented with a three dimensional view of the virtual
world.  If the virtual world allows user interaction the user will
be allowed to navigate in the world and interact with objects in the
world.

   If the user is to interact with the world and objects in
the world the user interface must present the user with a set of
controls that will allow the user to navigate, select objects, and
perform other interactions.

   Traditional user interfaces provide these controls in the
form of tool-bars or other groupings controls.  These groupings
typically are placed at the top or bottom of the display screen.

   In virtual worlds where the user may navigate in any
direction, including toward the top or bottom of the world, and
hence top or bottom of the display screen, multiple collections of
controls may occlude part of the display in the direction the user is
navigating.

   An improvement, shown in Figure 1, to the traditional
placement of controls would be to arrange the controls around the
edges of the display.  This gives the impression the user is looking
through a visor.  This visor would take relatively small space, only
one button width around the edge of the visor, but allows placement
of several control buttons.  The buttons can be arranged on the
display in order of usage or preference by the user.

   This placement of controls will also...