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Browse Prior Art Database

Detents and Continuous Selectivity in Slider Controls

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000123290D
Original Publication Date: 1998-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 105K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Molander, ME: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This invention combines detents ("snap tos"), which offer gross selectivity as well as reference points, with continuous selectivity for points between the detents, allowing users finer selectivity. Other aspects of this invention are to: o Visually indicate slider detents so they give more of a physical affordance of how they work. o Allow the slider tab to visibly snap into position at the detents, which could occur in a direction different than the primary movement of the slider. o Provide multiple levels of detents, such as major and minor detents.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 58% of the total text.

Detents and Continuous Selectivity in Slider Controls

   This invention combines detents ("snap tos"), which offer
gross selectivity as well as reference points, with continuous
selectivity for points between the detents, allowing users finer
selectivity.  Other aspects of this invention are to:
  o  Visually indicate slider detents so they give more of
     a physical affordance of how they work.
  o  Allow the slider tab to visibly snap into position at the
     detents, which could occur in a direction different than
     the primary movement of the slider.
  o  Provide multiple levels of detents, such as major and minor
     detents.

   Slider controls today either provide detents for a
restricted set of values, or they provide a continuous array of
choices within the entire range of choices.  The problem with just
providing pre-set detents is that they do not allow for fine tuning
between major settings.  For example, if the user wants to set a
detent-based slider to specify download speed, which has an inverse
relationship to image quality, then a slider with 7 detents would
restrict the user to just 7 possible settings.

   Another problem with sliders today is that ones
with continuous selectivity (no detents) are often hard to set.
Without the detents, which also double as reference points to help
guide the user, settings typically take a lot of trial and error.
This also makes it hard to remember the value of a setting.

   Combining ...