Browse Prior Art Database

Multi-Dimensional Slider Control

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000123291D
Original Publication Date: 1998-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-04
Document File: 3 page(s) / 64K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Molander, ME: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The essence of this invention is a slider control, which is also sometimes referred to as a range control, that is spatially laid out along two dimensions instead of one. It simultaneously controls the values of two variables by manipulating the position of the moving part of the control in a two dimensional space that represents the actual or approximated relationships between those two variables, whatever the function of that relationship may be.

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Multi-Dimensional Slider Control

   The essence of this invention is a slider control, which
is also sometimes referred to as a range control, that is spatially
laid out along two dimensions instead of one.  It simultaneously
controls the values of two variables by manipulating the position of
the moving part of the control in a two dimensional space that
represents the actual or approximated relationships between those two
variables, whatever the function of that relationship may be.

   Often there is an interaction between two variables.  For
instance, the time to download images from the web decreases as their
quality (e.g., resolution, bits per pixel, etc.) decreases.  As with
many functions, the quality vs. download-speed tradeoff in this
example gets plotted as a curve.  Some points on the curve will
produce a better return value.  This tradeoff in this example becomes
especially important with devices over low bandwidth connections
(e.g., wireless).  The user can make a better setting choice if he
can be more immersed in the tightly bound relationship between the
two variables.  The best way to do this is to combine the range
control and graph into one integrated control/display, as in the
Figure.

   There's no translating or any level of indirectness
imposed on the user to infer the effect one setting has on another.
It's also easy for the user to quickly size up the points on the
curve that will give him the best value in the tradeoffs between the
two v...