Browse Prior Art Database

Customized Power Management

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000123295D
Original Publication Date: 1998-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-04
Document File: 1 page(s) / 47K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Estroff, J: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Typical PC power management systems perform the task of saving power by powering down all or portions of the system off based on inactivity. In most cases, systems enter a lower power state based on the result of monitored inactivity on some predefined group of hardware within the system (e.g. mouse, keyboard, hard drive, etc.). For example, a system might enter a lower power state when no activity has been detected on the keyboard or mouse for 10, 15, or 30 minutes. On the Aptiva system this could be either standby or suspend (auto power off) modes. While this accomplishes the task of power management, it has one major drawback. When all or part of the system is powered down because of inactivity, those resources are not available on demand.

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Customized Power Management

   Typical PC power management systems perform the task of
saving power by powering down all or portions of the system off
based on inactivity.  In most cases, systems enter a lower power
state based on the result of monitored inactivity on some predefined
group of hardware within the system (e.g. mouse, keyboard, hard
drive, etc.).  For example, a system might enter a lower power state
when no activity has been detected on the keyboard or mouse for 10,
15, or 30 minutes.  On the Aptiva system this could be either standby
or suspend (auto power off) modes.  While this accomplishes the task
of power management, it has one major drawback.  When all or part of
the system is powered down because of inactivity, those resources are
not available on demand.  The delay associated with restoring the
system to a usable state causes a variety of problems for
applications that require system resources be instantaneously
available.

   For example, typical telephony suites that are shipped
with PCs include a message center and fax machine.  These
applications are seldom used because of the delay required to power
up the system and take a message or fax.  On most systems, the delay
is approximately 8-10 telephone rings.  This equates to approximately
25 seconds (3 seconds per ring) of delay.  Most callers or fax
machines will hang up long before the line is answered.  This is an
annoyance in a home application and a disaster in a business
environm...