Browse Prior Art Database

Integration of Legacy Protocols By Use of Channel Monikers

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000123322D
Original Publication Date: 1998-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 68K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Singhal, SK: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for signaling the use of parallel "non-native" protocol streams as part of an application interaction. Where the application interaction is modeled as a series of protocol channels, a special channel type (the moniker) is used to indicate the use of an external protocol. In this way, the non-native protocol retains its integrity and independence from the native application protocols.

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Integration of Legacy Protocols By Use of Channel Monikers

   Disclosed is a method for signaling the use of parallel
"non-native" protocol streams as part of an application interaction.
Where the application interaction is modeled as a series of protocol
channels, a special channel type (the moniker) is used to indicate
the use of an external protocol.  In this way, the non-native
protocol retains its integrity and independence from the native
application protocols.

   Numerous protocol suites, such as Avian, InVerse, T.120,
etc. employ a "channel"-oriented view of an information space.  An
application talks to a server to determine the set of available data
channels and subscribes to one or more of those channels.  Typically,
each channel is associated with a type, which defines how the
recipient should interpret the data delivered along the channel.  For
example, a channel's type might be "audio" or "video" or "text" or
"data."  Each protocol suite supports a fixed set of well-defined
media types.  Information about a channel might include other
elements, such as a name, data rate, security parameters, etc.

   It is often desirable for an application to incorporate
data that originates from multiple sources, some of which may not be
known to the primary protocol suite that is in use.  To accomodate
this integration, the channel types are augmented by channel monikers
that identify the particular non-native protocol and application
handler.  More specifically, a channel moniker is used as follows:
  o  Native application protocols may be identified by a
     designated moniker, such as "_Native".  For example, a
     channel of type "audio" might be renamed as
     "audio/_Native".  Note that the absence of a moniker
     implies that the channel is native.
  o  The applicat...