Browse Prior Art Database

A Token-Ring Protocol Learning Tool

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000123335D
Original Publication Date: 1998-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-04
Document File: 3 page(s) / 430K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bailis, RT: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a device, a universal teaching tool, for network protocols that allow students with wide ranges of backgrounds to understand concepts, experience creating different scenarios and to visualize results. A hand's-on model of a Token-Ring network interface card (and supporting software) allows students to operate as a Token-Ring computer station and interact with other students who are also acting as other computer stations on a Token-Ring network.

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A Token-Ring Protocol Learning Tool

   Disclosed is a device, a universal teaching tool, for
network protocols that allow students with wide ranges of
backgrounds to understand concepts, experience creating different
scenarios and to visualize results.  A hand's-on model of a
Token-Ring network interface card (and supporting software) allows
students to operate as a Token-Ring computer station and interact
with other students who are also acting as other computer stations on
a Token-Ring network.

   The tool, illustrated in Figure 1, features a four-state
machine (with indicator LEDs), student-inserted MAC Address card
simulation, automatic Source Address registration and indication,
student-assigned Destination Address (either a specific address, or a
broadcast address), voice message capture, voice message playback to
the properly filtering MAC address, and Free Token passing, capture,
and Token release.

   A plastic "card" was designed as a key that represents
each student's individual MAC Address.  An optical sensor senses the
MAC Address card and associated logic tests for address recognition
and filters as necessary.  Each student's key card, representing the
particular station's MAC address, is inserted into a slot as the tool
is passed around.  A sketch of the MAC Address key card is shown in
Figure 3.