Browse Prior Art Database

Digit Recognition

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000123354D
Original Publication Date: 1998-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-04
Document File: 1 page(s) / 25K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Comerford, LD: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed here is a system for increasing the accuracy of automated voice recognition for digits. In a preferred embodiment, each of the ten digits is replaced by an element of an easily remembered recognition code. For example, the digits 1 through 0 may be replaced by the first ten months of the year, January through October. This will work also in languages other than English. Another well known set of ten ordered words are the colors used to code numeric values for electronic components: black = 0, brown = 1, red = 2, and so on. Alternatively, any set of ten words or phrases may be employed. An example is the set of phrases that may be obtained from a popular song with little modification.

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Digit Recognition

   Disclosed here is a system for increasing the accuracy
of automated voice recognition for digits.  In a preferred
embodiment, each of the ten digits is replaced by an element of an
easily remembered recognition code.  For example, the digits 1
through 0 may be replaced by the first ten months of the year,
January through October.  This will work also in languages other
than English.  Another well known set of ten ordered words are the
colors used to code numeric values for electronic components: black =
0, brown = 1, red = 2, and so on.  Alternatively, any set of ten
words or phrases may be employed.  An example is the set of phrases
that may be obtained from a popular song with little modification.
Here the digits are represented by phrases in which they are also
included: 1 partridge in a pear tree, 2 calling birds, 3 french hens,
through zero lords a-leaping.  An additional embodiment of the
invention is the use of redundancy to improve recognition efficiency.
The digit 1 is replaced by the phrase one-thousand-and-one, 2 is
replaced by two-thousand-and-two, ..., zero remains zero.