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Management of Java* Classpath Definitions for Multiple Applications

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000123420D
Original Publication Date: 1998-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-04
Document File: 1 page(s) / 44K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Banks, T: AUTHOR

Abstract

A Java* application consists of main class and a set of referenced classes and resources. The referenced classes/resources are defined in the context of a classpath which is a sequence of elements, each of which is a filesystem that contains the class/resource names. The filesystems are often in the form of 'jar' or 'zip' files which, in the current state of the art, must be loaded before their contents can be interrogated. In a system containing multiple applications, multiple classpaths are required and components from all must be loaded before any application can be executed.

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Management of Java* Classpath Definitions for Multiple Applications

   A Java* application consists of main class and a
set of referenced classes and resources.  The referenced
classes/resources are defined in the context of a classpath which is
a sequence of elements, each of which is a filesystem that contains
the class/resource names.  The filesystems are often in the form of
'jar' or 'zip' files which, in the current state of the art, must be
loaded before their contents can be interrogated.  In a system
containing multiple applications, multiple classpaths are required
and components from all must be loaded before any application can be
executed.

   The solution described here is based on the recognition
that the CICS/ESA** enables sharing of a single inventory of
classes/resources by many applications without the need for
speculative loading or administration of classpaths for each
application.  The elements of the solution are:
  1.  The creation of an environment for each application.
  2.  Loading into that environment only the classes and
      resources referenced by the particular application.
  3.  Creation of symbolic references to the program objects
      (which, in the CICS/ESA implementation, correspond to
      'jar' or 'zip' files)     so that they can be located
      and loaded as required.
  4.  Consolidating the class/resource names into a single,
      global name scope.

   The jar and zip files are pre-...