Browse Prior Art Database

Improved Usability on a Standard Pointing Device Through Sticky Key Enablement

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000123465D
Original Publication Date: 1998-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-04
Document File: 1 page(s) / 55K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kamper, R: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The invention described here provides a method to adjust the interpretation of button presses to adapt to the physical characteristics of the end user, so that intended simultaneous button presses will be recorded as such by the computer system, even if the actual performance is sequential. This allows the computer system to adapt to the user, instead of the user having to adapt to the limits of the system, reducing errors in input and increasing accessibility beyond those individuals with the physical capacity to meet the requirements of the system parameters.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 55% of the total text.

Improved Usability on a Standard Pointing Device Through Sticky Key
Enablement

   The invention described here provides a method to adjust
the interpretation of button presses to adapt to the physical
characteristics of the end user, so that intended simultaneous
button presses will be recorded as such by the computer system, even
if the actual performance is sequential.  This allows the computer
system to adapt to the user, instead of the user having to adapt to
the limits of the system, reducing errors in input and increasing
accessibility beyond those individuals with the physical capacity to
meet the requirements of the system parameters.

   There are sets of disabilities that make the regular
operation of a computer difficult if not impossible.  Examples of
this are trembling hands/fingers, and numb hands, fingers (which can
cause the repeated pressing of a key on the keyboard, or a button on
a pointing device).  As our population grows older, and becomes
increasingly dependent on computers this will become more of an
issue.

   The solution for this is typically one of two things.  1)
The enablement of what is called "Sticky Keys" on for the
keyboard-input device.  This involves considering deferring the
release of a button press until after it has been combined with
another keystroke(s) giving the system the appearance of the user
having pressed multiple keys at once when in fact they were pressed
one at a time in succession.  This might also be teamed with...