Browse Prior Art Database

Remote Monitoring and Control of Distributed Client Applications

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000123483D
Original Publication Date: 1998-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-04
Document File: 1 page(s) / 51K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Smith, GC: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Problem When a solution requires that multiple applications execute on different machines in different physical locations, monitoring the running state of those applications may be critical. Additionally, managing the execution and termination of those applications can require knowledge of multiple operating systems for which users must have a user account with certain permissions. Consequently, it may be difficult or impossible for a particular user to monitor and control multiple applications on multiple networked machines.

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Remote Monitoring and Control of Distributed Client Applications

   Problem

   When a solution requires that multiple applications
execute on different machines in different physical locations,
monitoring the running state of those applications may be critical.
Additionally, managing the execution and termination of those
applications can require knowledge of multiple operating systems for
which users must have a user account with certain permissions.
Consequently, it may be difficult or impossible for a particular user
to monitor and control multiple applications on multiple networked
machines.

   Solution

   Messaging and queueing products, such as IBM's MQSeries,
provide a common data area (in the form of data queues) in which
blocks of information (messages) can be shared among multiple
applications.  Our implementation, built on top of MCSeries,
establishes a queue dedicated to inter-application messaging.  The
data messages placed in this queue are organized in a way that all
participating applications can understand.  The messages contain
commands as well as status information.  When a user needs to observe
the running state of a specific application, he places a query onto
the dedicated queue.  The query is addressed to a particular
application and contains a request for status information.  All
participating applications periodically scan the messaging queue,
retrieving messages addressed to them.  When an application retrieves
a message, it reads the...