Browse Prior Art Database

Optimizing Utilization of Storage within A GUI by "Hiding" Designated Storage Volume from the Operating System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000123616D
Original Publication Date: 1999-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 244K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kamper, RJ: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

Disclosed is an invention that provides the use of the same text label to designate two or more hard disk storage volumes so that such storage may be interchanged logically instead of physically. This provides benefits for computer system administration in both testing and operational environments.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 69% of the total text.

Optimizing Utilization of Storage within A GUI by "Hiding" Designated
Storage Volume from the Operating System

   Disclosed is an invention that  provides the use of the
same text label to designate two or more hard disk storage volumes so
that such storage may be interchanged logically instead of
physically.  This provides benefits for computer system
administration in both testing and operational environments.

   Disk storage volumes are conventionally allocated by
designating a drive letter to a specific storage volume.  In the
past, the assignment of drive letters has been automatically
assigned according to the sequence in which devices come online or
are physically connected to the computer system.

   In this invention, the allocation of drive letters is
assigned by the user, and may be reassigned dynamically.  In
addition, a volume with an assigned drive letter may be "hidden"
from the operating system, which frees the drive letter for
reassignment to a different storage volume.

   This achieves an advantage in the following ways:
  1.  Different devices and storage volumes can be switched in
      and out of hiding without changing system configuration or
      rebooting.  This has application in testing environments,
      where two or more different versions of applications,
      operating systems, or data can be dynamically
      interchanged.  See Fig. 1.
  2.  This also has application to operating environments, in
  ...