Browse Prior Art Database

Method for Providing Position Relative Audio Feedback in a Scrollable Content Area

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000123619D
Original Publication Date: 1999-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-05
Document File: 1 page(s) / 55K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bassett, R: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This invention concerns playing audio feedback based on the current size and position of scrollable content within a window being displayed. The audio feedback mechanism is an audio tone which varies over a given octave range as the content area is scrolled. The tone's frequency either rises or falls depending on the direction the scroll operation, and also depends upon the current view port position versus the entire scrollable area. The tone 's duration should be one second or less for each movement of content within the scrollable area. The rate of the change in frequency is governed by the relative size of the total content contained within the scroll area compared to the scroll view port, and the relative position within the area is being scrolled.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 55% of the total text.

Method for Providing Position Relative Audio Feedback in a Scrollable
Content Area

   This invention concerns playing audio feedback based on
the current size and position of scrollable content within a window
being displayed.  The audio feedback mechanism is an audio tone which
varies over a given octave range as the content area is scrolled.
The tone's frequency either rises or falls depending on the direction
the scroll operation, and also depends upon the current view port
position versus the entire scrollable area.  The tone 's duration
should be one second or less for each movement of content within the
scrollable area.  The rate of the change in frequency is governed by
the relative size of the total content contained within the scroll
area compared to the scroll view port, and the relative position
within the area is being scrolled.  This is the audio equivalent to
the visual feedback generated by a scroll bar slider which indicates
one's current position within a large (scrollable) content area.
Another fixed-frequency audio tone can be used to indicate when the
user has reached the top, bottom, left, or right extent of a web
page, indicating that no further scrolling is possible in that
direction.

   The utility of this invention can easily be seen in the
context of a Web Browser which typically displays web page content
(rendered HTML, graphics, etc.) within a default size window.  Often,
the web page content extends beyond the size of the default window
...