Browse Prior Art Database

Attracting Attention to a Displayed Object

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000123643D
Original Publication Date: 1999-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-05
Document File: 1 page(s) / 47K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bailey, NR: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

When working with a Graphical User Interface (GUI) occasions can occur where an application other than that currently being processed by the user requires the user's attention, or possibly has ceased to require attention.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 67% of the total text.

Attracting Attention to a Displayed Object

   When working with a Graphical User Interface (GUI)
occasions can occur where an application other than that currently
being processed by the user requires the user's attention, or
possibly has ceased to require attention.

   In the arrangement described here attention to (or
distraction from) a displayed object, such as an icon or window or
current workspace is achieved by a singular or multiple moving of the
target object without changing any of its other properties eg. shape,
colour, intensity, foreground or background states.  The moving of
the object is such as to attract attention to it by virtue of its
positional movement and the human eye's sensitivity to such
movements.  The degree of attraction or distraction is controlled by
the size, repetitiveness and frequency of movement.

   This approach is particularly appropriate for monochromatic
and fixed intensity displays where other visual stimuli are not
possible, and for users or machines with colour or light sensitivity
deficiencies.  It requires no audible alarm or other message to be
given.

Examples of implementation are:
  1) When working in an application window, another
     application or task attracts attention by gently
     moving/jittering/vibrating its own Icon or Window.
  2) When working in an application window, another application
     or task draws attention to the fact that there is another
     task or application that requires...