Browse Prior Art Database

Remote Control of System Performance to Ensure Network Quality of Service

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000123677D
Original Publication Date: 1999-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 70K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cromer, D: AUTHOR [+6]

Abstract

Problem Solved By This Invention: Client PCs are an integral part of medium and large networks. Within these networks PCs assume various roles such as: client, print server, file server, or proxy server. PCs with Network Interface Cards (NICs) have become a critical part of network performance equation. Technologies such as RMON & RMON II have been develop to provide statistics on network traffic. This allows IS manager to monitor quality of service issues such as: number of packets dropped, retries, timeouts, response time, and throughput.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Remote Control of System Performance to Ensure Network Quality of
Service

   Problem Solved By This Invention:

   Client PCs are an integral part of medium and large
networks.  Within these networks PCs assume various roles such as:
client, print server, file server, or proxy server.  PCs with Network
Interface Cards (NICs) have become a critical part of network
performance equation.  Technologies such as RMON & RMON II have been
develop to provide statistics on network traffic.  This allows IS
manager to monitor quality of service issues such as: number of
packets dropped, retries, timeouts, response time, and throughput.

   Achieving acceptable performance depends on the
interaction between the NIC and the PC.  PC systems have various
levels of power management.  The solution can range from blanking the
monitor to entering a full suspend state.  Control of the Power State
is moving into the OS with technologies like ACPI.  However there is
still an opportunity to save power in a full on state.

   Some chipset have the ability to slow the CPU
clock to converse power, when the CPU is in a period of low activity.
ACPI is designed to handle system and device power states and not to
handle efficiency of components in those states, for example the
CPU running at 10, 50, or 100% full power.

   Changing the CPU performance can have significant
performance impact on network subsystem, if the CPU is in slow clock
mode and unable to service interrupts.  If the network interrupts are
monitored, the system will never enter a low power state due to
broadcast traffic f...