Browse Prior Art Database

Fixed Eye-point Positioning Method of Overlaid Computer Screen

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000123710D
Original Publication Date: 1999-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-05
Document File: 8 page(s) / 253K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Mukai, S: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a method of positioning a computer screen overlaid to scenery view according to the current position of a pointer or a cursor on the screen. The position of the screen is determined so that the pointer or the cursor is located at the center of the scenery view, whenever the pointer or the cursor moves to any position in the screen, in order to minimize movement of eye-point (line of vision).

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Fixed Eye-point Positioning Method of Overlaid Computer Screen

   Disclosed is a method of positioning a computer screen
overlaid to scenery view according to the current position of a
pointer or a cursor on the screen.  The position of the screen is
determined so that the pointer or the cursor is located at the
center of the scenery view, whenever the pointer or the cursor moves
to any position in the screen, in order to minimize movement of
eye-point (line of vision).

   The new method is as follows.  When a screen image is
overlaid with scenery; and a pointer, which is moved by a pointing
device by a operator, is used in the screen, the pointer is not moved
relative to the scenery, but the screen is moved relative to the
scenery instead.

   The Fig. 1 to Fig. 3 shows a conventional presentation
and movement of a pointer of a pointing device on the screen, when a
screen is overlaid with the scenery.  The overlaid screen is place at
a certain fixed position relative to the scenery.  (Fig. 1.) When a
pointer is moved by a pointing device (mouse in this figure), the
pointer moves to the another point on the screen.  (Fig. 2.)
Eye-point of the operator will move according to the pointer
position.  When a pointer is moved to the other part of the screen
the eye-point will move to there, relatively to the scenery.  (Fig.
3.) When the operator finish to look at the screen, he/she will
return his/her eye-point to the center of the scenery where he/she
was looking at.

   Fig. 4 to 6 shows the invented new method.  The screen
is placed relative to the scenery so that the current pointer
position is coincident with the center of the scenery, which is
defined as the center of operator's view range of scenery.  (Fig. 4.)
When the pointer is tried to be moved by the operator, the pointer
doesn't move relatively to the scenery, and the screen moves
relatively to the scenery instead, in the opposite direction against
the pointing device operation.  (The movement of the pointer
relatively to the screen is kept in the same manner as the
conventional case.) Fig. 5 and Fig. 6.)  By the new invented method,
eye-point movement of an operator relative to scenery is reduced to
the minimum, and accordingly, dangers that operator may lose the
sense of the scenery wh...