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Bulkload Tool for LDAP/DB2

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000123755D
Original Publication Date: 1999-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-05
Document File: 7 page(s) / 173K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bachmann, D: AUTHOR [+9]

Abstract

There are two ways to create a LDAP database from scratch: First, a user can create the database on-line using LDAP server. With this method, users simply start up LDAP server (slapd) and add entries using the LDAP client tool ldapadd. This method is fine for relatively small database.

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Bulkload Tool for LDAP/DB2

   There are two ways to create a LDAP database from scratch:
First, a user can create the database on-line using LDAP server.
With this method, users simply start up LDAP server (slapd) and add
entries using the LDAP client tool ldapadd.  This method is fine for
relatively small database.

   The second method is to create the database off-line,
using ldif2db.  This method is suitable for adding large number of
entries into the database.  The first method will take a long time to
complete.

   In this disclosure, the design of a superfast tools named
"bulkload" based on DB2 LOAD facility is presented.  Compared with
ldif2db which adds entries one at a time into the database,
"bulkload" performs up to 25 times faster.  It is also about twice as
fast as the off-line database creation tool from Netscape LDAP
server.
  "bulkload" also has the following unique features:
  1.  Adding entries into existing database.  "bulkload" can be
      used not only for creating a LDAP database from scratch,
      also adding entries into a existing database.
  2.  Schema syntax check.  User can turn on the schema check
      to prevent ill-formated entries got inserted into the
      database.

   The bulkload problem is invoked like this:
  bulkload-i <ldif file>-f <configuration file>-m * 1| 0"
  -d<debug level>
  -i <ldif file name>
  -f <configuration file name> . Default is /etc/slapd.conf
  -m:  1: Invoke db2 load (default).
       0: Invoke db2 import.

   We also provide the following Environment Variables:
  LDAPIMPORT
    The directory of temporary files parsed out from awk scripts.
    The default is /tmp/ldapimport.
    The space needed for the tmp files is about 2.5 time of ldif
    file size.
    If /tmp file system does not have the enough space, assign
    this variable to a larger file system.
    e.g. export LDAPIMPORT=/var/ldaptmp
  SCHEMACHECK:
    NO    no schema check
    YES   do schema check  (default)
    ONLY  do schema check  only.  No bulkload and ACL update.
    It checks to see if attribute is defined in slapd.at.conf
    and comply to required and allowed requirement of the object
    class.  It also checks if binary value is encoded with b64
    format correctly.
    e.g. export SCHEMA_CHECK=NO
  ACLCHECK:
  NO    Bypass the ACL update.  If there is no acl attributes
        among all the entries, it can be turned off.
  YES   Go through ACL update.  (default)
  e.g   export ACLCHECK=NO
  DB2SORTTMP:
    When LOAD utility loads a file into a table that contains
    indexes, temporary files will be created in the sort
    directory.  The default is /<db2 instance owner's home
    directory>/sqllib/t mp.  When loading a multi-million
    entries database, this directory is very likely to run
    out of the space.  With DB2SORTTMP, you can select which
   ...