Browse Prior Art Database

Java Applet Language Translator

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000123766D
Original Publication Date: 1999-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-05
Document File: 1 page(s) / 34K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Breslau, FC: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Described below is a translator which runs in a Java Virtual Machine (JVM). This applet is capable of taking user highlighted text in one language and, with a suitable resident dictionary, translating the text into another language. This would be very useful when an e-mail note is sent to someone who is only somewhat literate in another language. The launched applet would search the highlighted text, look up all of the words in a dictionary, and output the translated text (delineated by flags) after the highlighted area. Contextual translation could also be attempted.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 100% of the total text.

Java Applet Language Translator

   Described below is a translator which runs in a Java
Virtual Machine (JVM).  This applet is capable of taking user
highlighted text in one language and, with a suitable resident
dictionary, translating the text into another language.  This would
be very useful when an e-mail note is sent to someone who is only
somewhat literate in another language.  The launched applet would
search the highlighted text, look up all of the words in a
dictionary, and output the translated text (delineated by flags)
after the highlighted area.  Contextual translation could also be
attempted.

   This would also be useful in international forums on
the Internet or in "chat rooms" where questions, answers, and
dialogues could be conducted in multiple languages and the
respondents need not be conversant in all of the languages being
used.  If desired, a premium service could be used by the applet to
transmit highlighted text, and receive translated text from a live
translator.

   This disclosure alleviates the problem of people
communicating in different languages via e-mail or the Internet
without being fluent or conversant in these languages.  Also, if a
portion of text is too difficult to be understood, the applet could
be invoked for just that portion.  Similarly, if corresponding with
an individual who is more conversant in another language, portions of
a message can be translated into the recipient's native language to
enhance understanding.