Browse Prior Art Database

Limited Space Entry-Field Control

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000123777D
Original Publication Date: 1999-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 76K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cox, PH: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a GUI control to more efficiently utilize the amount of space available on the small display screen of a handheld or palmtop personal computer. This control graphically combines the text label and entry field of a standard entry field control and requires a novel interaction technique to access either the label or the field information. The disclosed integration of the label and field necessarily entails that only a single item can be displayed at once -- either the label or the text in the field. This limitation in the item display may be safely implemented with little impact to usability because there are many instances in which label information is superfluous once the data has been entered into its companion entry field (e.g.

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Limited Space Entry-Field Control

   Disclosed is a GUI control to more efficiently utilize
the amount of space available on the small display screen of a
handheld or palmtop personal computer.  This control graphically
combines the text label and entry field of a standard entry field
control and requires a novel interaction technique to access either
the label or the field information.  The disclosed integration of the
label and field necessarily entails that only a single item can be
displayed at once -- either the label or the text in the field.  This
limitation in the item display may be safely implemented with little
impact to usability because there are many instances in which label
information is superfluous once the data has been entered into its
companion entry field (e.g., when using an address database
application, the text "1000 Main Street" is obviously an address --
the label "Address" becomes essentially unnecessary).  By integrating
the two elements of a single control, screen real estate is conserved
and allows for the placement of additional controls or  information.
Provided that this new control is appropriately implemented (i.e.,
when information in the entry field has such an obvious meaning that
it requires no omnipresent label), the trade-off between increased
screen space and the loss of simultaneous display of the label and
entry field content will benefit the user.  A specific implementation
of this is as follows:

   The default presentation of the combined entry field
control is with the label of the empty field appearing in italics in
the space of the entry field itself.  The italicized text label
indicates that the entry field has no data.  To add data in the
entry field, the user must simultaneously depress the Alt key an...