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Managing Classes and Interfaces of an Enterprise JavaBean Component

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000123785D
Original Publication Date: 1999-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-05
Document File: 3 page(s) / 180K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Chan, VS: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

A bean according to the Sun Microsystems, Inc. Enterprise JavaBean specification (hereinafter an EJB) contains a number of Java classes and interfaces such as the home interface, remote interface, bean class, key class and container specific implementation classes. In these Java classes and interfaces, there is typically shared and duplicated information. For example, when a user defines a business method, it must be defined in both the bean class and the home interface. Accordingly, when the signature of a business method is changed, it must be changed in both the bean class and the remote interface. Another example is the container managed (CMP) fields. If a CMP field is also a key field, it must be defined in both the key class and the bean class.

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Managing Classes and Interfaces of an Enterprise JavaBean Component

   A bean according to the Sun Microsystems, Inc. Enterprise
JavaBean specification (hereinafter an EJB) contains a number of
Java classes and interfaces such as the home interface, remote
interface, bean class, key class and container specific
implementation classes.  In these Java classes and interfaces, there
is typically  shared and duplicated information.  For example, when a
user defines a business method, it must be defined in both the bean
class and the home interface.  Accordingly, when the signature of a
business method is changed, it must be changed in both the bean class
and the remote interface.  Another example is the container managed
(CMP) fields.  If a CMP field is also a key field, it must be defined
in both the key class and the bean class.  If the key needs to be
changed, it must be changed in both the key class and the bean class.

   If a user manually manages the individual classes and
interfaces of an EJB, it can be a very tedious task and it can also
be very error prone.  Another challenge to providing EJB support in
an integrated development environment (IDE) is the user interface.
Each EJB contains a serialized deployment descriptor object in
addition to the set of Java classes and interfaces.  Users of the IDE
should be able to change the deployment descriptor in addition to
navigating all the EJB classes and interfaces for a specific EJB.

   Most commercially available IDEs today allow a user to
edit individual Java classes and interfaces effectively.  A Java
class and interface centric view will make it difficult for the EJB
developer who needs to be able to manage a set of associated Java
classes and interfaces that form an EJB.  This publication describes
an efficient way for developers to create and manage EJBs in an IDE.
There is introduced the concept of EJB objects in the IDE.  An EJB
object in the IDE manages the consistence of the Java  classes and
interfaces that form an EJB.  It also allows users to create multiple
versions of an EJB.  When a specific version of an EJB object is
loaded into the IDE, the corresponding versions of the Java classes
and interfaces are loaded automatically into the IDE.

   The following describes how an EJB may be implemented as
an object in an IDE:
  o  A wizard is provided to create an EJB.  When an EJB is
     created, an EJB object is created along with the EJB Java
     classes and interfaces.  Users will view all the EJB classes
     and interfaces as part of the EJB object.
  o  An EJB graphical user interface view is provided.  The EJB
     view is a 4-pane screen that allows users to show E...