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LAN Based Educational System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000123799D
Original Publication Date: 1999-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-05
Document File: 4 page(s) / 165K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Challener, DC: AUTHOR

Abstract

A computerized teaching system is described which makes use of the internet to provide lessons to a student, either in Individual Mode, or with teacher direction. This system provides a number of advantages over other teaching systems in that it: 1. Allows for selection from among many different lesson plans for the same topic. 2. Keeps track of student's knowledge base. 3. Keeps track of what the student's best learning strategy is, and fits a lesson plan to the student. 4. Allows for authors to be compensated based on how often their particular lesson is used. 5. Allows a student to find out what he doesn't know and can easily learn. 6. Allows a student to map out a path to learning a selected topic, customized to his pre-existent knowledge base. 7.

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LAN Based Educational System

   A computerized teaching system is described which makes
use of the internet to provide lessons to a student, either in
Individual Mode, or with teacher direction.  This system provides a
number of advantages over other teaching systems in that it:
  1.  Allows for selection from among many different lesson
      plans for the same topic.
  2.  Keeps track of student's knowledge base.
  3.  Keeps track of what the student's best learning strategy
      is, and fits a lesson plan to the student.
  4.  Allows for authors to be compensated based on how often
      their particular lesson is used.
  5.  Allows a student to find out what he doesn't know and can
      easily learn.
  6.  Allows a student to map out a path to learning a selected
      topic, customized to his pre-existent knowledge base.
  7.  Allows a teacher to get immediate feedback on how the
      students are performing.
  8.  Allows a teacher to produce a syllabus for a course.
  9.  Allows a student to go at his own pace.

   The system consists of at least two parts, a server and a
client.  The client represents a student; the server helps the
student (and the teacher) in the educational process.  The server is
fed a relational database that includes an entry for each elemental
lesson that is to be learned.  Each entry has the following data:
  1.  A pointer to the entries that are immediate prerequisites
      to the learning of the lesson.
  2.  A pointer to the HTML page that has the contents of the
      lesson.
  3.  A pointer to the Java program that contains the test to
      determine if the knowledge has been acquired.
  4.  What the lesson teaches.
  5.  The style of the lesson.
  6.  The author of the lesson.

   In addition, the server keeps a local database list of all
those lessons for which the student has passed the associated test,
and the style of teaching the student prefers.

   When a student logs on, and is authenticated to the server
(using standard secure protocols) the server looks up in its
database and finds those lessons that the student has already
achieved, and the style of teaching the student prefers.  The
student then can select a number of actions from the user interface
he is presented:
  1.  See all those lessons I currently have the prerequisites
      to learn.
  2.  See a mapping of all the lessons in the database.

   If the student chooses the first, the server goes through
its list of lessons, checking their prerequisites.  All lessons that
are not in the server's local database of lessons indicate the
student has passed the associate test.  It also list the lessons that
are prerequisites.  Only lessons that are in the database of lessons
the student "knows" are put together into a list.  This list, and the
student database, are sent to the student by the server.

   When the client receives these two pa...