Browse Prior Art Database

Buried Dielectric for Improved Lead-to-Shield Insulation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000123808D
Original Publication Date: 1999-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-05
Document File: 1 page(s) / 59K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hsiao, R: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In a magnetic read head, the senor and the shield are separated by a gap material. The gap thickness defines the linear density that a read sensor can achieve. This same gap material also provides the electrical insulation between the shield and the senor and between the shield and the lead that is connected to the sensor. As the gap thickness decreases with the increasing recording density, an electrical short is more likely to occur. Since the area between the lead and the shield is much greater than that between the sensor and the shield and the thin gap is only required between the sensor and the shield, an ideal structure is to have a thicker insulation between the lead and the shield.

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Buried Dielectric for Improved Lead-to-Shield Insulation

   In a magnetic read head, the senor and the shield are
separated by a gap material.  The gap thickness defines the linear
density that a read sensor can achieve.  This same gap material also
provides the electrical insulation between the shield and the senor
and between the shield and the lead that is connected to the sensor.
As the gap thickness decreases with the increasing recording density,
an electrical short is more likely to occur.  Since the area between
the lead and the shield is much greater than that between the sensor
and the shield and the thin gap is only required between the sensor
and the shield, an ideal structure is to have a thicker insulation
between the lead and the shield.

   Disclosed is a method of producing a thicker dielectric
between the first shield and the lead in a self-aligned manner.  The
method begins by fabricating the first shield.  The gap and the
sensor material are then deposited.  After sensor deposition, a
patterning process is applied.  In this process, for each recording
head, an area with a width corresponding to the sensor trackwidth is
masked.  An oxygen ion implantation step follows this masking
process.  By properly choosing the energy of ion plantation a buried
oxide can be produced, outside the masked area, right underneath the
gap material.  In the masked area, the oxygen is implanted into the
mask and will not reach the sensor material underneath.  For...