Browse Prior Art Database

Use of RFID to Detect Lost or Stolen Assets

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000123844D
Original Publication Date: 1999-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 68K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cromer, D: AUTHOR [+7]

Abstract

Problem Solved By This Invention: Significant costs are associated with asset tracking of client PCs in a large corporate environment. Manually locating and inventorying each individual system is the typical method used. IBM has implemented Desktop Management Interface (DMI) technology on all desktop PCs. This allows the IS manager to remotely query and determine configuration of PC clients via the network. The PC client is identified by a Universal Unique Identification (UUID) as a unique entity on the network.

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Use of RFID to Detect Lost or Stolen Assets

   Problem Solved By This Invention:

   Significant costs are associated with asset tracking of
client PCs in a large corporate environment.  Manually locating and
inventorying each individual system is the typical method used.  IBM
has implemented Desktop Management Interface (DMI) technology on all
desktop PCs.  This allows the IS manager to remotely query and
determine configuration of PC clients via the network.  The PC client
is identified by a Universal Unique Identification (UUID) as a unique
entity on the network.

   A limitation of DMI technology is that it cannot
determine the physical location of the each asset.  The IS manager
must rely on an inventory sheet that correlates UUIDs to office or
location that was manually created.  For example, if there was going
to be a change in routers/bridges in a building such as Building 201,
then the IS manager must manually search installation reports to
determine if machines are in Building 201.  This is not a very
effective mechanism given that PC clients are relatively easy to pick
up and are often moved or relocated without permission.  Also,
location records may not be current.

   Several large customers have complained that they have
machines that they can manage remotely via DMI but have never been
able to determine the location of those systems.

   IBM has provided RFID technology that allows a PC to
communicate to a hand held reader to exchange information similar to
DMI.  A draw back to the RFID technology is the range of the hand
held which requires close proximity (12 inches) to the client.  The
technology is excellent when...