Browse Prior Art Database

Wake on Access from Cable Modem

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000123845D
Original Publication Date: 1999-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 95K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cromer, D: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

Problem Solved By This Invention: Cable modem technology is rapidly penetrating US households. Cable modems offer the key benefit of constant connectivity. Because cable modems use connection-less technology, much like an office LAN, a subscriber's PC is always on-line with the network. The only problem is the subscriber's PC is not always turned on. This invention will add a defined protocol that, when transmitted to the subscriber's PC, will power up the PC to receive the packets from the network.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Wake on Access from Cable Modem

   Problem Solved By This Invention:

   Cable modem technology is rapidly penetrating US
households.  Cable modems offer the key benefit of constant
connectivity.  Because cable modems use connection-less technology,
much like an office LAN, a subscriber's PC is always on-line with the
network.  The only problem is the subscriber's PC is not always
turned on.  This invention will add a defined protocol that, when
transmitted to the subscriber's PC, will power up the PC to receive
the packets from the network.

   Description of Invention:

   Cable systems were originally designed to deliver
broadcast television signals efficiently to subscribers' homes.  To
ensure that consumers could obtain cable service with the same TV
sets they use to receive over-the-air broadcast TV signals, cable
operators recreate a portion of the over-the-air radio frequency
(RF) spectrum within a sealed coaxial cable line.

   Traditional coaxial cable systems typically operate
with 330 MHz or 450 MHz of capacity, whereas modern hybrid fiber/coax
(HFC) systems are expanded to 750 MHz or more.

   Logically, downstream video programming signals begin
around 50 MHz, the equivalent of channel 2 for over-the-air
television signals.

   The 5 MHz - 42 MHz portion of the spectrum is usually
reserved for upstream communications from subscribers' homes.

   Each standard television channel occupies 6 MHz of RF
spectrum.  Thus a traditional cable system with 400 MHz of
downstream bandwidth can carry the equivalent of 60 analog TV
channels and a modern HFC system with 700 MHz of downstream
bandwidth has the capacity for some 110 channels.

   Cable Modem Access Networks

   To deliver data services over a cable network, one
television channel (in the 50 - 750 MHz range) is typically
allocated for downstream traffic to homes and another channel (in the
5 - 42 MHz band) is used to carry upstream signals.

   A cable modem headend system communicates through
these channels with cable modems located in subscriber homes to
create a virtual local area network (LAN) connection.  Most cable
modems are external devices that connect to a personal computer (PC)
through a standard 10 Base-T Ethernet card and twisted-pair wiring.

   The cable modem access network ope...