Browse Prior Art Database

Archived Kernel Extensions

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000123901D
Original Publication Date: 1999-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-05
Document File: 1 page(s) / 66K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Mealey, BG: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for managing multiple versions of a kernel extension or device driver for a single system. The method employs existing technologies utilized in archival of loadable shared objects, applied at the kernel level for loadable kernel images.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Archived Kernel Extensions

   Disclosed is a method for managing multiple versions of a
kernel extension or device driver for a single system.  The method
employs existing technologies utilized in archival of loadable shared
objects, applied at the kernel level for loadable kernel images.

   Supporting multiple versions of the same kernel extension
or device driver in a single installed system image presents several
difficulties to installation, system administration, and update
procedures.  For example, with the evolution of today's hardware
systems, 64-bit technology has required operating systems to now
provide 64-bit kernels.  The 64-bit kernels have in turn required
kernel extensions and device drivers to then become 64-bit, all the
while continuing to support their 32-bit predecessors.  A further
complication is the ability for some processors, such as the
*PowerPC, to run either a 32-bit or 64-bit environment.  This gives
the customer the flexibility to choose to run a 32-bit operating
system kernel or a 64-bit operating system kernel depending on
specific scalability and application workload demands.  With this
flexibility comes the requirement that at least two versions of every
kernel extension and device driver be available for selection
dependent on the operating environment chosen.

   Using traditional kernel extension and device driver
packaging and configuration methods, this would have required
another complete set of kernel extension and device driver
installable file sets to be created and maintained.  Unique
extension names would have been introduced to distinguish the 64-bit
versions from the 32-bit version...