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Browse Prior Art Database

Position Relative Audio Feedback When Using Graphical User Interface Controls

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000123922D
Original Publication Date: 1999-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 71K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bassett, RW: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is an improvement to computer operating system usability through the use of audio feedback based on the current position of a graphical user interface control such as but not limited to: (a) sliders (b) knobs / wheels (c) spinners / spin boxes (d) checkboxes (e) selection / choice / list boxes (f) text entry fields (g) radio buttons (h) menu bars

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Position Relative Audio Feedback When Using Graphical User Interface
Controls

   Disclosed is an improvement to computer operating system
usability through the use of audio feedback based on the current
position of a graphical user interface control such as but not
limited to:
    (a) sliders
    (b) knobs / wheels
    (c) spinners / spin boxes
    (d) checkboxes
    (e) selection / choice / list boxes
    (f) text entry fields
    (g) radio buttons
    (h) menu bars

   As the graphical user interface control is manipulated by a
user, an audio sound (digitized audio) or audio tone / frequency (or
multiple combined frequencies) can be generated, audibly providing
positional relative feedback to the user of the control within the
context or range of the control being manipulated.  For example, a
computer system could represent its current audio volume level by
presenting an graphical user interface audio control knob or wheel to
the user.  Using this knob, the user can adjust the audio output
volume of the system.  As the knob is adjusted by the user, the
system could emit a digitized audio sound that will increase in
volume or decibels as the knob moved in a direction that should
produce higher volume.  Alternatively, as the knob is adjusted by the
user towards a lower level of volume or decibels, the system could
emit a digitized audio sound that will decrease in volume.  The sound
that is emitted can be continuous, or discrete as the application
requires.  The sound can change in frequency according to how the
control is being manipulated - ascending frequency or volume
(decibels) as the control is being adjusted towards the end of its
total range, and descending frequency or volume (decibels) as the
control is...