Browse Prior Art Database

Method and System for Dynamic Television Services Using the World-Wide Web

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000123934D
Original Publication Date: 1999-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-05
Document File: 1 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Singhal, SK: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Today, the integration of television and the Web is largely superficial. For instance, WebTV allows users to surf the Web, using the TV as a monitor, but the Web is not used to provide any incremental value to the user's television watching experience. As a result, we see considerable duplication in resources. For instance, closed captioning information is sent in-band with the television signal; this information must be encoded and maintained. On the other hand, program transcripts are usually produced, maintained, and distributed by third parties. Of course, closed captioning and transcripts contain similar, if not identical information.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 73% of the total text.

Method and System for Dynamic Television Services Using the World-Wide
Web

   Today, the integration of television and the Web is largely
superficial.  For instance, WebTV allows users to surf the Web,
using the TV as a monitor, but the Web is not used to provide any
incremental value to the user's television watching experience.  As a
result, we see considerable duplication in resources.  For instance,
closed captioning information is sent in-band with the television
signal; this information must be encoded and maintained.  On the
other hand, program transcripts are usually produced, maintained, and
distributed by third parties.  Of course, closed captioning and
transcripts contain similar, if not identical information.

   Disclosed is a method and system for using HTTP to enable
the dynamic delivery of information to the television viewer while
simultaneously supporting off-line or delayed access to that
information.

   The television reserves a portion of the screen for the
display of retrieved Web content.

   Through the closed-captioning side-band channel, the
broadcaster provides an encoded URL, along with a timestamp/delay.
URLs consume less bandwidth than the content itself.  They can
therefore be transmitted in real-time, allowing the real content to
be larger and more complex.  This Mechanism also allows the
client/user to more directly manage what information is retrieved
over the network (e.g. different languages, etc.)

   As the timestamp arrive...