Browse Prior Art Database

Method for Excluding User-Specified World Wide Web Graphics

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000123953D
Original Publication Date: 1999-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-05
Document File: 1 page(s) / 74K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Samodovitz, AJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

The World Wide Web (WWW) is well known today and comprises a multitude of computer servers and a network by which clients can communicate with the servers. The client typically includes a "web browser" to provide a user interface to the WWW. The servers provide data to the clients in the form of web pages, each having a URL address. Each web page which is loaded to the client is represented by a high text markup language (html) file which comprises a specification of each component of the web page- regular text (i.e. text which is always displayed), graphics, alternate text (text which is displayed in the event that respective graphics are not displayed), the nature of each component and whether each text or graphic component is "clickable:, i.e. a link to another web page. The format of the html is an industry standard.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Method for Excluding User-Specified World Wide Web Graphics

   The World Wide Web (WWW) is well known today and comprises
a multitude of computer servers and a network by which clients can
communicate with the servers.  The client typically includes a "web
browser" to provide a user interface to the WWW.  The servers
provide data to the clients in the form of web pages, each having a
URL address.  Each web page which is loaded to the client is
represented by a high text markup language (html) file which
comprises a specification of each component of the web page- regular
text (i.e. text which is always displayed), graphics, alternate text
(text which is displayed in the event that respective graphics are
not displayed), the nature of each component and whether each text or
graphic component is "clickable:, i.e. a link to another web page.
The format of the html is an industry standard.  In the case of text,
the html defines the actual text and its location on the web page.
However, in the case of graphics, the html does not define the
graphics itself but instead specifies a pointer to other files on
other servers which actually define the graphics.  Some of the
graphics are complex.  While the graphics add meaning to the web page
and can serve as click points, they are often time consuming to
load.  To minimize load time, existing web browsers permit the user
to request a web page without graphics, i.e. "graphics off".  In such
a case, the web browser does not load any graphics and instead,
displays simple icons and the alternate text, if any, from the html.

   Most web browsers also give the user the opportunity to
store a "hot list" (or "book marks") of web page URLs that the user
will likely want to load again.  Thereafter, w...