Browse Prior Art Database

Use of Publish/Subscribe for Interprocess Communication

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000123957D
Original Publication Date: 1999-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-05
Document File: 1 page(s) / 48K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Ayres, MD: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

Within modern server architectures it is increasingly desirable to allow server code to be executed in parallel in multiple processes. Where this is the case, there is a need for those processes to share information. This is traditionally done in a platform specific manner, requiring private protocols, and explicit knowledge within the processes of their peers.

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Use of Publish/Subscribe for Interprocess Communication

   Within modern server architectures it is increasingly
desirable to allow server code to be executed in parallel in
multiple processes.  Where this is the case, there is a need for
those processes to share information.  This is traditionally done in
a platform specific manner, requiring private protocols, and
explicit knowledge within the processes of their peers.

   Publish/Subscribe technology allows producers and consumers
of information to be independent of each other.  It also provides a
defined protocol for communication between the producers and
consumers.

   Parallel processes may therefore use publish/subscribe
technology to synchronize their state.  One process is designated
the main process, and configuration updates are sent directly to it.
Each other process registers itself with the main process as a
subscriber on a predefined, reserved topic name.  The main process
thus requires no specific knowledge of any of the other processes.

   When the main process receives configuration updates, it
internally publishes a message on the reserved topic name, including
the configuration information in the message.  This publication is
delivered by the publish/subscribe mechanism to the other processes.

   Similarly, the main process may subscribe on a system
topic, and the other processes may publish information on that topic
in order to send it to the main process.  Using a naming system where
eac...