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Dual Function Optical Trapping and Spectroscopic Analyzer System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000124057D
Publication Date: 2005-Apr-07
Document File: 3 page(s) / 124K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for a system that combines an optical trapping device and an in-situ spectroscopic analyzer. The system detects low concentrations of molecules, and monitors the trapping and sorting of nanotubes, proteins, and other organic and inorganic materials. Benefits include a solution that increases the local concentration of trapped molecules and detects the changes in-situ.

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Dual Function Optical Trapping and Spectroscopic Analyzer System

Disclosed is a method for a system that combines an optical trapping device and an in-situ spectroscopic analyzer. The system detects low concentrations of molecules, and monitors the trapping and sorting of nanotubes, proteins, and other organic and inorganic materials. Benefits include a solution that increases the local concentration of trapped molecules and detects the changes in-situ.

Background

Currently, it is difficult to detect and analyze the effect of the optical trap on the molecules, nanoparticles, and other object during optical trapping. Currently, there is no integrated in-situ spectroscopic detection method that exists for optical trapping.

General Description

Figure 1 shows an example of the disclosed method with a dual-beam optical trapping device analyzer. The red arrows indicate the trapping laser light path; the blue arrows indicate the excitation laser light path; the purple arrows indicate the light path of the signal collected by the probe. The CCD camera is optional for this system. The single-beam trapping system is built by removing the excitation laser (using a trapping laser for both trapping and excitation), or by removing the trapping laser (using the excitation laser for both trapping and excitation). The right inset of Figure 1 shows an example of trapping-soluble carbon nanotubes, in-situ detection, and analysis by spectroscopy.

In Figure 1, the excitation laser shares the same optical axis with the trapping laser. However, in another implementation of the disclosed method, the two laser beams are arranged so that they do not share one optic...