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Active Thermal Control Mechanism for Device Under Test

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000124061D
Publication Date: 2005-Apr-07
Document File: 3 page(s) / 67K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method that consists of a pressure regulator, vortex tube, mesh heater, and temperature sensor, to achieve target temperatures for soaked and de-soaked tested devices. Benefits include a solution that is less expensive than present Active Thermal Control chucks.

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Active Thermal Control Mechanism for Device Under Test

Disclosed is a method that consists of a pressure regulator, vortex tube, mesh heater, and temperature sensor, to achieve target temperatures for soaked and de-soaked tested devices. Benefits include a solution that is less expensive than present Active Thermal Control chucks.

Background

Currently, an Active Thermal Control chuck mechanically contacts the device under test (DUT) to provide a heat transfer path (see Figure 1); this provides thermal control for the device under test, or in soak/de-soak.

Prior to test, the DUT is soaked to reach the test temperature, using either a convective oven process (which is throughput limited and poorly controlled), or a fast (but expensive) direct contact with an Active Thermal Control chuck. In the later case, this same chuck also controls the DUT temperature during the test and during the de-soak time, which is when the device is brought back to room temperature. Active Thermal Control of the DUT during the test improves device yields. Basically, Active Thermal Control chuck dissipates more heat on its heater foil when the DUT dissipates less heat, and, conversely, the heater foil dissipates less heat when the DUT dissipates more heat. The end result is a smaller variation of the die temperature during the test, which results in better yields, or a faster arrival to the test temperature during the soak,
(i.e. bigger throughput).

General Description

The disclosed method reduces the cost of the Active Thermal Control solution. The disclosed method closely approximates performance of the Active Thermal Control chuck, but at a much lower cost, and is especially applicable to the soak/de-soak infrastructure in class test, although it is also applicable to class DUT testing for low to medi...