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MULTIPLEX COMMUNICATION SYSTEM FOR USE IN A VEHICLE

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000124111D
Publication Date: 2005-Apr-08
Document File: 4 page(s) / 67K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

System layout with units (1-9) of different types, e.g. EBS-type and ELC-type, all units having standardized interfaces meaning that they can be assembled into modules according to different requirements, e.g. depending on how a truck is configured. The module is then connected to only one communication bus and one electronics interface and one pneumatics interface on the chassis, whereby all the units in a module use the same communication bus and the same electronics interface and the same pneumatics interface on the chassis. The different units in the modules can be controlled by distributed electronic control units (1), one for each module, or a central control unit (not shown), using multiplex data communication signals, e.g. of CAN-type, over a network. Using the system layout mentioned above, the amount of cables leading from the chassis to the driver compartment and the number of components on the chassis and in the driver compartment is reduced together with the cost for the system as standardized components, possibly from different manufacturers, are used.

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MULTIPLEX COMMUNICATION SYSTEM FOR USE IN A VEHICLE

    At present, heavy vehicles such as trucks use many different
systems mounted on different places on the chassis. Such
systems are e.g. the Electronic Brake System, and the
Electronic Level Control system. These systems have some
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drawbacks: e.g., they require a lot of space on the chassis
and a lot of cables leading to the driving compartment where
the control units for the respective systems are situated.

     The above mentioned drawbacks are solved using a novel system
layout with standardized interfaces where the system can be
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assembled according to the specific requirements in every
situation, e.g. depending on how a truck is configured. The
units making up the system can be assembled into modules using
the same communication bus and electronics interface and
pneumatics interface for all the units in a module. The
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different units communicate with each other using multiplex
data communication over a network of e.g. CAN (Controlled Area
Network)-type or FLEXRAY-type.

     Figure 1 shows a system layout with nine units (1-9) of
different types, all having standardized interfaces meaning
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that they can be assembled into modules according to different
requirements. For example, the module on the "rear drive axle
2" comprises four units: an "electronic control unit" (1), a
"brake unit rear 1" (3), an "electronic level control unit"
(5), and a "differential lock control unit" (6). The module is
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then connected to only one communication bus and one
electronics interface and one pneumatics interface on the
chassis, whereby a...