Browse Prior Art Database

A CVD Tool for the Deposition of Diamond Films on a Multiplicity of Silicon Wafers

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000124190D
Publication Date: 2005-Apr-11
Document File: 3 page(s) / 216K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for a CVD tool (i.e. furnace) that uses the hot filament CVD process to deposit diamond films on multiple silicon wafers simultaneously. Benefits include reducing process costs.

This text was extracted from a Microsoft Word document.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 53% of the total text.

A CVD Tool for the Deposition of Diamond Films on a Multiplicity of Silicon Wafers

Disclosed is a method for a CVD tool (i.e. furnace) that uses the hot filament CVD process to deposit diamond films on multiple silicon wafers simultaneously. Benefits include reducing process costs.

Background

Depositing diamond films by CVD techniques is typically a very slow process, particularly if the flatness and geometrical aspect of the silicon wafers must be maintained at a certain level. Currently, there is no known approach for depositing diamond films at high growth rates
(i.e. >10 microns/hour) on silicon wafers. High deposition rates require very high energy inputs, resulting in the overheating and fracturing of wafers. Consequently, it is not feasible to deposit
~ 20 to 50 microns of diamond on 200 and 300 mm wafers at high deposition rates requiring high energy input processes. It is possible to deposit diamond films on large-area silicon wafers (with low deposition rates and low energy input processes), but this is not cost effective since such tools are single wafer tools (see Figure 1).

General Description

CVD diamond films are used in a number of semiconductor applications including. Diamond films are embedded in silicon wafers for thermal management. Porous diamond films are currently being developed for low dielectric constant and high mechanical strength ILD films. As a mechanically stiff material, thin diamond films may be used to introduce strain in transistors to enhance mobility. These and other applications require that the deposition technologies are
cost effective.

In order to deposit high quality diamond films by CVD, it is necessary to have a super-saturation of atomic hydrogen in the process gas mix. The atomic hydrogen stabilizes the diamond phase of carbon, and selectively etches any non-diamond forms of carbon that might form. This is achieved by using a very small concentration of the...