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Assaying Bundle Formation and Structure in Suspensions of Carbon Nanotube Materials

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000124192D
Publication Date: 2005-Apr-11
Document File: 2 page(s) / 13K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method that uses light scattering analysis (LSA) to perform an in situ, nondestructive assay of solution-suspended carbon nanotubes; the assay can be performed as standalone or flow-based process control measurements. Benefits include improving the monitoring of nanotube solutions.

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Assaying Bundle Formation and Structure in Suspensions of Carbon Nanotube Materials

Disclosed is a method that uses light scattering analysis (LSA) to perform an in situ, nondestructive assay of solution-suspended carbon nanotubes; the assay can be performed as standalone or flow-based process control measurements. Benefits include improving the monitoring of nanotube solutions.

Background

Carbon nanotubes are formed as knotted bundles of fibers with ~1 nanometer diameter and greatly varying length. They can be separated into single threads and individually suspended in water, but the processes also forms soluble suspended bundles of tubes. The current method of quantitatively assaying these bundle formations deposits a dilute solution of the nanotubes on an ultra-flat surface, then scans this surface with an atomic force microscope (AFM) in several places to measure their vertical height. The heights must be statistically averaged to get an assay of the starting solution. This technique wastes material during spin-coating and deposition, and is also slow and statistically vulnerable; a true estimate of bundle size and concentration requires a large number of serial measurements.

Particle sizing using LSA is not new, but the mathematical processing and using LSA instruments for assaying nanotube bundles is a new adaptation of this technology. LSA is typically used for spherical or globular particles, whereas this method analyzes high aspect ratio, poly-disperse, cylindrical nonmaterial.

General Description

The disclosed method uses LSA to perform an in situ, nondestructive...