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nano-Moieties to Enable a No-Clean Surface

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000124197D
Original Publication Date: 2005-Apr-11
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-11
Document File: 2 page(s) / 23K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Andrew Skipor: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

The rich experience by users of personal mobile communication devices, can be diminished when finger print stains, facial oils, cosmetic residue, and materials known as "dirt" adheres to the phone's surface making it unsightly. Here we discuss methods to functionalize a paint or surface coating that can then be tailored to meet user requirements by simple attachment steps.

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nano-Moieties to Enable a No-Clean Surface

Andrew Skipor, Bill Hoffman, and Steven Scheifers

Motorola

Abstract     

The rich experience by users of personal mobile communication devices, can be diminished when finger print stains, facial oils, cosmetic residue, and materials known as "dirt" adheres to the phone’s surface making it unsightly. Here we discuss methods to functionalize a paint or surface coating that can then be tailored to meet user requirements by simple attachment steps.

Discussion

The rich experience by users of personal mobile communication devices can be diminished when finger print stains, facial oils, cosmetic residue, and materials known as "dirt" adheres to the phones surface making it unsightly. The consumer almost instinctively cleans the phones by rubbing it on his or her clothing or use tissues. Textiles and tissues are also abrasive, resulting in further degradation of the surface, in turn reducing the high gloss finish.  This is not just limited to personal communication devices and could easily apply, for example, to a car finish.

There are 3 basic approaches to make surfaces liquid-phobic, that is, to repel liquids:

1) Construct a sub-micron scale rough surface, an example is “Lotus-effect” or alkyl ketene dimer (AquapelTM 364 water repellent coating for paper).  This method works well with water since water has a surface energy of ~73 ergs/cm sqr.  When a water drop comes in contact with these nano-scale crystals, the water drop is for the most part surrounded by air, since it is resting on the tips of the crystals, forming a droplet due to its high surface tension.  This approach will not work as well for organic liquids as it does for water, since organics have much lower surface energies (for example ether ~17).

2) Formulate the surface with an active agent that breaks down “dirt”, e.g. attach TiO2 to a surface, which breaks down organic substances when exposed to UV light.  This approach requires continuous exposure to UV light and the broken down organic matter needs to be washed or brushed  away.

3) Create a surface with very low surface energy enabled by the use of fluorinated polymers. Dupont invented TeflonTM, non-stick pans is a well known application. This polymer is attached to metal surfaces via adhesion after significant amount of roughening of the metal...