Browse Prior Art Database

Service Discovery Adaptation Service for Mobile Networks

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000124280D
Original Publication Date: 2005-May-20
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-May-20
Document File: 3 page(s) / 69K

Publishing Venue

Siemens

Related People

Juergen Carstens: CONTACT

Abstract

There are a number of different Service Discovery (SD) protocols existing nowadays. Some examples are Universal Plug & Play (UP&P), Service Discovery Protocol (SDP), Resource Location Protocol (RLP) and Service Location Protocol (SLP). Most of these are higher layer protocols (above IP layer). Once the user has attached to a certain network and has configured an IP address, such protocols allow the user to learn about the services the network offers. These could be e.g. printers, copy machines, or access to the internet. However, so far it is not possible for the user to get this information prior to attachment. Some protocols, like the modified Extensible Authentication Protocol (EAP) or the modified Reverse Address Resolution Protocol (RARP), allow for the user to get information about the IP layer. But still the problem exists that these lower layer protocols can't convey the services provided on higher layers. With the existing protocols and methods, the user only has the option to get information about the lower layer services, attach to a network, get an IP address, and then browse the higher layer services. If the required service is not provided by the chosen network, he has to disconnect and try another one. Therefore, it is proposed to introduce a "Service Discovery Adaptation Server" (SDAS). This server is capable of handling several higher and lower layer SD protocols and converts their payload to a database or information set. This information is broadcasted to the terminals as an advertisement or it can be transmitted on request. Hence, the information about the available services can be provided to the user prior to attachment once a physical layer link is established. On the other hand, the server can also forward the client's request to all service providing entities that are using the respective protocol and are registered at the SDAS. This provides freedom to the terminals to use their preferred SDP and also allows the SDAS to extend and update its database (Figure 1).

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Service Discovery Adaptation Service for Mobile Networks

Idea: Dr. Kalyan Koora, DE-Bocholt; Elena Meshkova, DE-Bocholt

There are a number of different Service Discovery (SD) protocols existing nowadays. Some examples are Universal Plug & Play (UP&P), Service Discovery Protocol (SDP), Resource Location Protocol (RLP) and Service Location Protocol (SLP). Most of these are higher layer protocols (above IP layer). Once the user has attached to a certain network and has configured an IP address, such protocols allow the user to learn about the services the network offers. These could be e.g. printers, copy machines, or access to the internet. However, so far it is not possible for the user to get this information prior to attachment. Some protocols, like the modified Extensible Authentication Protocol (EAP) or the modified Reverse Address Resolution Protocol (RARP), allow for the user to get information about the IP layer. But still the problem exists that these lower layer protocols can't convey the services provided on higher layers. With the existing protocols and methods, the user only has the option to get information about the lower layer services, attach to a network, get an IP address, and then browse the higher layer services. If the required service is not provided by the chosen network, he has to disconnect and try another one.

Therefore, it is proposed to introduce a "Service Discovery Adaptation Server" (SDAS). This server is capable of handling several higher and lower layer SD protocols and converts their payload to a database or information set. This information is broadcasted to the terminals as an advertisement or it can be transmitted on request. Hence, the information about the available services can be provided to the user prior to attachment once a physical layer link is established. On the other hand, the server can also forward the client's request to all service providing entities that are using the respective protocol and are registered at the SDAS. This provides freedom to the terminals to use their preferred SDP and also allows the SDAS to extend and update its database (Figure 1).

To clarify the concept, we discuss two...