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Method for secure wireless authentication using a portable active key to communicate configuration information over a one-wire interface

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000124295D
Publication Date: 2005-Apr-14
Document File: 7 page(s) / 339K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for secure wireless authentication using a portable active key to communicate configuration information over a one-wire interface. Benefits include improved functionality, improved performance, and improved cost effectiveness.

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Method for secure wireless authentication using a portable active key to communicate configuration information over a one-wire interface

Disclosed is a method for secure wireless authentication using a portable active key to communicate configuration information over a one-wire interface. Benefits include improved functionality, improved performance, and improved cost effectiveness.

Background

              Radio frequency identification (RFID) is a technology of growing importance. Many products are expected to incorporate RFIDs as components within their systems.

              Conventionally, secure wireless authentication is required for admission into a network of RFID readers. The authentication sequence is the passing of a seed key. It is typically a very long key, such as 128 bits. A successful exchange can be accomplished in several ways, including the following:
•             Typing in the 128 character sequence without error

•             Typing in a reduced version of this key that is much less secure

•             Hooking-up an expensive device and using special software to download the key over a physical link, such as a serial interface

              None of these methods are simple and secure. They constitute an ease-of-use problem.

              The following specifications apply to RFIDs and RFID communication:

•             “Standard for Information Technology - Telecommunications and information exchange between systems - Local and Metropolitan Area networks - Specific requirements - Part 11: Wireless LAN Medium Access Control (MAC) and Physical Layer (PHY) specifications”, designated 802.11-1999, dated July 15, 1999, owned by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc.

•             “IEEE Recommended Practice for Telecommunications and Information exchange between systems – Local and metropolitan area networks Specific Requirements - Part 15.2: Coexistence of Wireless Personal Area Networks with Other Wireless Devices Operating in Unlicensed Frequency Band”, designated as 802.15.2-2003, dated August 28, 2003, owned by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc.

•             “13.56 ISM Band Class 1 Radio Frequency Identification Tag Interface Specification”, version 1.0.0, dated February 1, 2003, owned by EPCglobal, Inc.

•             “860MHz – 930MHz Class 1 Radio Frequency (RF) Identification Tag Radio Frequency & Logical Communication Interface Specification “, version 1.0.1, dated November 14, 2002, owned by EPCglobal, Inc.

•             “Auto-ID Reader Protocol”, version 1.0, dated September 5, 2003, owned by EPCglobal, Inc.

•             “Hypertext Transfer Protocol – HTTP/1.1”, RFC2616, dated June 1999, owned by Network Working Group Internet Engineering Task Force

•             “Radio frequency identification for item management -- Part 6: Parameters for air interface communications at 860 MHz to 960 MHz”, designated as ISO/IEC 18000-6:2004, dated August 31, 2004, owned b...